Rhode Island – 2012 – H7541 – Dyslexia Diagnosis and Treatment

This act would enact the Rhode Island dyslexia act to establish policies and treatment for students with dyslexia in Rhode Island schools.  Provides that local education agencies must consider symptoms and diagnosis of dyslexia in developing literacy intervention plans and individual education plans.Sets standards for  instructional plans for students with reading disabilities and dyslexia based on legislative finding that scientific evidence supports systematic phonics based instruction.

2 Responses to “Rhode Island – 2012 – H7541 – Dyslexia Diagnosis and Treatment”

  1. Lauren Burbank Says:

    This organization opposed this bill in RI that would allow students to be screened early but supported the Massachusetts bill? There is scientifically based research on all the multisensory programs. As far as private interest groups it is not my 9 year old daughters fault so few of the teachers in RI are trained in Orton Gillingham. She attended one of the private interest groups and jumped from reading level I to reading level M being taught their non research based program.

  2. DDAI Says:

    Lauren, we generally cannot comment on legislation from past sessions that failed to pass.

    It is often the case that a poorly written law can cause more problems than it solves, even with the best of intentions. Apparently, we were not the only ones who felt that the bill introduced in Rhode Island in 2012 was poorly drafted, as it was unable to pass out of committee.

    Our general concerns are explained in our position statements: we do not want to see laws passed that put in more educational restrictions or would stand in the way of a child getting the individualized services that federal law provides.

    We are happy to explain our position on current legislation, in an effort to see good laws passed.

    I am sure that you would not have wanted to see your daughter denied services on the basis that whatever program you chose didn’t happen to be on the school’s list of acceptable programs.

    Here’s an article that explains why many dyslexic children do not do well with phonics-based instruction:

    When Phonics Doesn’t Work
    http://www.dyslexia.com/library/phonics.htm

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