Virginia 2010 SJR 87 Dyslexia Screening

early identificationStudy; dyslexia screening in kindergarten; report. Requests the Department of Education to study dyslexia screening for kindergarteners.
In conducting its study, the Department shall
(i) examine available scientific data on the success of early screening for dyslexia,
(ii) consider the cost-effectiveness of such strategy, and
(iii) make recommendations as to whether such screening is advisable and, if so, the particular method that is most effective.

11 Responses to “Virginia 2010 SJR 87 Dyslexia Screening”

  1. katherine applewhite Says:

    please pass a law to have all kids screen for Dyslexia, as early intervention makes all the difference for these students! And school does not have to be hard!!! They can learn to read, and their is suport out there, they just need to reached early on!!! I will support any paper work or anything to help with this. Katherine Applewhite

  2. katherine applewhite Says:

    i say yes to the dyslexia screening!!!

  3. Christine Boehling Says:

    Our children with dyslexia are gifted and intelligent. With early intervention they will achieve their potential and be amazing, productive members of society. Statics show that early intervention is key in remediation. Waiting for failure is unacceptable. Professionals know that dyslexia can be diagnosed at 5 years of age and risks for dyslexia evident younger than 5 years of age. For the health and future of these children, please pass this bill.

    Yes to screening kindergarteners!
    Christine Burnham Boehling

  4. Lauren Campbell Says:

    We currently screen for so many things why not dyslexia especially when early diagnosis can make a difference in future success – not only in the classroom but also in terms of confidence and life?. All American children deserve an equal chance – shouldn’t the screening for disorders also be equal? Please help all children have a good shot at living up to their potential! With proper tutoring dyslexia can be corrected and children can thrive. To me, early screening is similiar to an immunization – we can “fix” or correct an illness – why would we chose not to do so especially when it is a young child we are talking about – these are the ones that need our help and assistance the most, right?

  5. Marie O'Grady Says:

    We all know, early intervention is essential for making the biggest impact on rewiring a child’s brain. For example, autism and language based disabilities, early diagnosis and intervention statistically leads to better life outcomes for that child. The same is true for any language based disability, which includes dyslexia. A simple screening tool whoud be to find out if a sibling has dyslexia (then other sibs. have a 50% chance of having dyslexia) and if one parent is dyslexic. These students are at high risk and should be identified as such. Interventions in the long run will be less for states if dyslexics are taught with Orton-Gillingham programs. These students with several years of this specific programming will be able to read well enough to never need any additional special education. The problem is dyslexics are identified too late. In 2-6th grade and sometimes older, and these students rarely leave the special education system. If intervention was provided in K-3 these children will not need to remain in special education. The cost savings is tremendous. All students benefit and learn from Orton-Gillianham programming and if schools were to implement these programs into their regular education reading programs then very few students will need special education post 3rd grade. Identify these students is critical to their futures. Waiting for them to fail before intervening is unacceptable.

  6. denise gunderson Says:

    It is critical that early screening is available to our children “OUR FUTURE”. The children that do struggle with language based reading issues DESERVE to be treated as equal, these children have so much to offer! The gifts that our children have will serve them well in life and being able to have all opportunities available to them to excel academically will only further their bright futures. All states should institute early screening and be able to provide the Orton Gillingham method of tutoring for those students that are in need of remediation. The key is clearly early identification and remediation!

  7. Carolyn Callahan Says:

    I agree in that early screening is the only way to identify and address dyslexic children’s needs. I find it very interesting the the State of Virginia does not even call it dyslexia anymore. The new term is language based disorder. I can alone attest to the number of hours, personal dollars and emotions that have been spent when all that was needed and recommended by outside professional was an Orton-Gillingham intervention. Four years later (7th grade) the schools finially said yes to intervention. Why shoudl htese childrens success be at risk. Dyslexia can only be addressed thorugh interventions not accomodations alone. These children are bright and they are fighters. Regardless of the disability early interventions with appropriate intervantions is the only way these children will realize their true abilities. The state of Virginia needs to stop wasting time and implement soudn strategies to address children with dyslexia.

  8. Sharon Grubbs Says:

    We must have dyslexia screening in place for Virginia’s school children. My child has dyslexia and the school system does not recognize it. It took years to identify her with a learning disability. She is very intelligent and tested out for Special Education/IEP. I had to fight and fight to get her help and identified. I am also a teacher in the same county. Why is it so hard for some states to understand the needs of our children and other states have no problem?? Texas has an excellent school program for dyslexic children. My husband is dyslexic and I have heard the horror stories of his childhood, because the public school system failed him. He later dropped out of school and I don’t want that for my daughter!

  9. Stacy Chambers Says:

    I have para educated in the Fredericksburg City school system in VA for 3 1/2 years. I para educated in special education K-5. I was told that my younger son would “catch up”, “It’s developmental, he’ll grow out of it”. Now that he is in 2nd grade and can read but can not write I am getting him help. No one spoke to me about dyslexia. No one. I asked his teachers and his pediatrician and no one ever mentioned that he might have dyslexia. Now that I know what I’m dealing with….the school is not there to help me. The school psychologist tests for Special Education eligibility only.They will not even use the word dyslexia. They use the words learning disability in combination with auditory processing disorder, etc. It is frustrating that they send the message “Doesn’t qualify for special education but struggling too hard to succeed”. Frankly if my son DID qualify for services through the school, there is NO service they have in place that would help him. Reading remediation is not helping him because it doesn’t work on his dysgraphia. It is IMPERATIVE that the schools in VA start screening for dyslexic children in Kindergarten! My son could have been identified over 2 years ago! This is the LEAST the schools can do if they are not even going to help parents with specialized dyslexia remediation programs!

  10. Joan Rizek Says:

    What is the status of the study?

  11. DDAI Says:

    I’m sorry Joan, but we don’t have a way of tracking the study — this site only tracks legislation, not what happens after passage.

    I would suggest that you contact the bill’s sponsor, Jill Vogel, to let her know of your interest and find out what information she can provide. Here’s a link to the contact form on her web page:
    http://www.senatorjillvogel.com/services/contact/

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